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Most women dream of the day they’ll become a mother. Yet, my reality was different. The dream of becoming a mother was ripped away from me long before I could consider it. I knew that I wanted children, but I wasn’t in a rush to have them. Now, the words of my doctor confirmed I probably never would. I remember crying because I was a wife, but I would never experience being a mother. Although, my doctor assured me that all issues of PCOS weren’t the same in every woman—it didn’t ease my worries.

My first thing was discovering what PCOS actually was. PCOS is Polycystic Ovary Syndrome, which is a hormonal disorder common for most women. Most women don’t know the condition exist until formally diagnosed. PCOS causes irregular or painful periods, excessive body and/or facial hair, pelvic pain, infertility, miscarriages, changes in weight, and mood swings just to name a few. It can also lead to other autoimmune disorders such as diabetes, heart disease, and IBS. I had been experiencing some of these symptoms since high school, but contributed it to other factors. However, now I had to figure out how I would overcome this.

My doctor stressed lifestyle changes, weight loss, and minimizing stress as a start. So I decided to dedicate myself to working on my physical, mental, and spiritual self. I took control of my life and made the necessary changes within a year and a half of my diagnosis. I changed my eating habits along with portion sizes. I pushed myself to work out,  and listened to my body when it spoke. I started dedicating more time for mindfulness and spiritual practices. I began studying the path to spiritual awareness and aligning my body as one. I knew that my life and maybe even the potential lives of my children depended on it. Within a year, I lost over 50 pounds and found myself in the process. However, I had to loose my marriage, my sanity, and even gained an angel baby in the process. Upon, my next annual visit with my specialist, my prognosis had changed. I didn’t need the medication to maintain my PCOS or insulin resistance. My body had regulated itself with the dedication I put into making my body a temple again. I still experience other symptoms such as facial hair and occasional moods swings; however, most of my symptoms are maintained with holistic approaches. To women that are struggling with PCOS—keep striving to overcome. I thought the word infertility meant the end of my world. The truth is, my world was just starting. That one diagnosis allowed me to discover what boundaries I was placing on myself. Now, I look forward to the day someone calls me mommy because I’ll know I worked to beat the odds.