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Image courtesy of TechWarn

As technology continues to improve dramatically, cybersecurity continues to be an issue as many tech companies appear to emphasize profits over security. Just look around and you will see the numerous data breaches that occur on a daily basis. Hackers continue to implement sophisticated methods and will stop at nothing to try and steal your personal information. Other than hacking, governments are now spying on their citizens. For instance, the Cambridge Analytica managed to access personal information of 50 million + Facebook subscribers, which was used to influence the 2016 presidential election. The information included their relationship status, where they lived, and when they were born.

All these work to show how important it is to use a VPN when browsing the internet. A VPN won’t protect irresponsible tech companies from leaking your important data, but can at least make sure that it’s not snooped on by malicious actors, ISPs, or the government on its way to the internet under your watch.

One company that is now known to take the security of its consumers serious is HP Inc. After realizing that its customers are likely to connect to unsecured Wi-Fi networks without thinking of the consequences, HP has decided to have a VPN pre-installed in some of its devices.

HP and ExpressVPN Partnership

HP—a tech company known for its PCs and printers recently entered into a win-win partnership with ExpressVPN—a cybersecurity company known for its speedy and reliable VPN service. This partnership will see a select number of HP devices come preinstalled with ExpressVPN software, starting with the newly-launched Spectre x360 13. Users will receive a 30-day free trial that will help them gauge whether the VPN is a good fit or not; thereafter, they will have an opportunity to buy a longer-term subscription or opt-out. The 30 days free trial will also give customers a privilege to enjoy all of ExpressVPN’s apps including those for Android and iOS.

HP plans to roll over this security measure to more of its devices, so you don’t need to worry if buying the Spectre x360 13 is not within your budget at the moment. It is clear that laptop users need a VPN as they tend to mostly use them on the go, which prompts them to connect to unsecured public Wi-Fi networks, hence risking their personal data. By pre-installing a VPN on their laptops, HP will ensure that even consumers who may not know what a VPN is may benefit from its many uses.

Why the Partnership is Important

As stated earlier, most tech companies care more about their reputation and profits and less about the security of their consumers. The partnership between HP and ExpressVPN is a good sign that some tech companies are now taking the issue of cybersecurity seriously. We can only hope that other tech giants will follow suit. We also hope that the 30 days trial period will help users understand how a VPN helps maintain privacy and circumventing censorship, so that they can take it upon themselves and subscribe for longer-term protection.

About ExpressVPN

ExpressVPN tops the list of the most trusted VPNs on the market and for a good reason. It has a huge network; it is secure, fast, supports torrents, unblocks Netflix, has no serious lagging, and is easy to use. With its TrustedServer technology, ExpressVPN ensures that your data is kept away from everyone else except yourself. It does this by making sure that your data never gets stored. Never! While most other VPN servers use hard drives to store information, ExpressVPN uses a more volatile method of storage– RAM. This means that every time their server is rebooted; all the information is erased, keeping you as secure as possible.

ExpressVPN’s TrustedServer technology ensures that users are fully protected, which is most probably the reason why HP chose to partner with them.

ExpressVPN and HP have come together to not only bring VPNs to more users but to also raise awareness on cybersecurity in general. The two companies realize the importance of security in the tech industry and what a better way to educate both device manufacturers and users than to have a partnership between a tech company and a cybersecurity company.

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